Quick Tip – Word Definition Window

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You can look up word definitions in any of your dictionaries, or even several websites, by using the Word Definition window. To access it, right-click on the word you want to look up from the book you are reading, and choose “Definition for” from the pop-up menu, and the Word Definition window will appear on your screen opened to the definition of that word.

Lord right click menu example

You can also go to Tools on your toolbar and choose Word Definition, and then type in a word in the “Enter term” bar at the top of the window.

You will notice there are different tabs located in your Word Definition window. If you have any dictionaries downloaded in WORDsearch, you will see a tab called My Dictionaries. This tab will list all of your installed dictionaries, and you can see the definition (if there is one) in each one. If your books do not have a definition for that particular search, they will not appear in the list. The ones that do contain a definition for the word you are searching will appear in black text. There are also tabs for websites that you can also use to read different definitions.

If your word has several different results in each book, you can click on hyperlink of each article to see the definition.

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You can also click Open in a new window to see the book containing your definitions open in a new window next to your Word Definition window.

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Have you learned anything recently using the Word Definition window? Share with us in the comments below!

Quick Tip – Carousels

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Bibles, commentaries, and dictionary windows have a feature known as a carousel. A carousel allows you to set up a list of favorite books that you can flip to rapidly without opening multiple windows. To set up or use a carousel, use the controls at the bottom of a carousel-equipped window (on the bottom left corner of a Bible, commentary or dictionary window):

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Use the Manage Carousel button managecarouselbtn to add, remove or reorder books in the carousel. Use the blue buttons to flip between books in the carousel.

For example, assume you set up your Bible carousel as follows:

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The image above shows the list of available Bibles on the left, and two Bibles in a carousel on the right. In this case, the Bibles are the Amplified Bible and Holman Christian Standard Bible. Clicking the right arrow would cycle through each of the Bibles in that list in order.

For an alternate way of comparing Bible translations, see the Parallel Bible window.

The carousel helps you quickly navigate through your favorite books quickly without having to go to the library window. What books are on your carousel? Share with us in the comments below! 

Quick Tip – History Window

quick_tips_fbEver read something while you are working in WORDsearch that strikes you, but you close the window and forget what book you were reading or where you were? Luckily, WORDsearch has a history window to help you quickly navigate back to where you were, including the location in the book.

Here’s a (very) quick, but helpful, tip on how to view your history and get back to your reading and studying.

To view this window, click its entry in the Tools menu.

historymenuThe history window will open, showing you the date, book, and location. It will open like a book would, so if you have books open when you open the history window, they will stay open and the history window will open alongside them.

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To navigate to any entry in the history list, either double-click it or select it and press the Enter key on your keyboard.

To change the sort order in the history window, click on any of the column headings. In the picture above they are outlined in red. The column controlling the sort order will have an arrow next to it.

There you have it! Now you don’t have to worry if you forget what book you were in, and you have an easy way to get back to where you were.

Have you ever used the history window? Share with us in the comments below?

Quick Tips – Desktops

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A Desktop in WORDsearch is like having a stack of study tools (as mentioned in our Guest Post – Stacks) for different needs you might have. You can set up multiple Desktops and have the books you use the most saved open, ready to go. For example, you can have a “Morning Devotional” Desktop set up with your daily devotional and your favorite Bible opened. Then you can open your “Sermon Creation” Desktop, where you have your most used commentaries and Word Study tools, along with parallel Bibles set up. Each desktop is like a separate copy of WORDsearch, and each keeps track of highlighting, personal notes, open books, and preferences. Everything you do in your Desktop is kept separate from work done in all other Desktops. Desktops are also a great tool to use for multiple family members. Each person can have separate preferences and active study sessions.

Now that we understand the benefits of having different Desktops, let’s go through the steps to create, manage, and open Desktops.

Some notes to know first:

  • The first time you start WORDsearch you will automatically have a Desktop created called “My Desktop.”
  • WORDsearch automatically updates your Desktop as you use the program, so you don’t have to remember to save your changes before exiting. You can even leave windows open when you exit, and they will be restored them the next time you run WORDsearch.
  • When you create a new Desktop, it is totally empty and has no highlighting, personal notes, or open windows carried over from the previously active Desktop.

How to Create a New Desktop

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1. From the File menu, click on Create Desktop, or click on the Desktop button on the main tool bar and select Create Desktop. 


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2. In the Create New Desktop dialog box that appears, enter a name for your Desktop. For example, “Sermon Creation.”

3.  You can choose to create a new desktop using the default settings or using the settings from the current Desktop. Settings include preferred books and Preferences.

4. Click on the OK button.

How to Manage Your Desktops

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1. Click on the Desktops button located on the Tool Bar.

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2. Click on the Manage Desktops menu item.

3. The Manage Desktops window will open.

How to Open a Desktop

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1. Click on the Desktop button located on the toolbar on the Main window.

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2. Click on the name of the desktop found on the drop down menu that you would like to open.

That’s it! What are the name’s of your different Desktops? Share with us in the comments below!

Get to Know Donald Cantrell

donald cantrellDonald Cantrell has been a preacher of the gospel since 1980. His goal in writing books is to be helpful to ministers who may need a simple thought to prompt them in developing a mighty message. His hope is to be practical, preachable, and accessible to the busy and pressured pastor.

In addition to preaching and writing, Donald has been active in personal sermon consulting and research, offering help with individual sermon development, subject research, Bible character studies, and sermon series. He has also helped various pastorates with the leading of revivals.

With the new release of his Bible Commentary Snapshots on WORDsearch today, we talked with the Florida Gators fan about his alliteration style, preaching, and his writing process.

WORDsearch: Where did you get the idea for this series?

Donald Cantrell: I have people contact me all the time from around the world, asking for advice. I like mentoring and helping people, that’s the primary goal. In the SBC in Georgia, the high majority of people are bivocational, and me doing this can help save them time.

I’ve always developed sermons and done alliteration, but then I started thinking what I wanted to do was come up with something catchy that would give a pastor or preacher something they could take straight to the puplit or develop into a full sermon on their own. I really liked the term “sermon snapshots.” I thought about it for a few days and really think it describes the material I create for a preacher.

 WS: What would you say is different in this work from your other works?

DC: This one I will try to do every verse in the New Testament and make sure every verse has an outline, or part of an outline, and that it’s alliterated. So far I’ve got Matthew- Acts, and I  just got done with 50 Christmas snapshots.

WS: What is your process in creating content? How do you get started?

DC: My main process is to first read the Scripture and then I like to think about it. Then I do my three or four main points, alliterate them, but very simply. Then I try to develop my main thoughts. Here’s how I look at it: I look at it like at first minimum alliteration, then once I have my main thoughts I go back and change and adapt it, then when it’s all said and done, my whole outline is all done, and I have what I call maximum alliteration. Alliteration is my thing, I’ve always been able to do it once I’ve started.

WS: How do you choose the verses or topics you cover?

DC: Well, I’m a pastor and I design sermons for my church also. If I get into something I really like at my church, I might just make a whole series out of it and offer it to pastors.

WS: How do you come up with your sermons?

DC: I like to do expository preaching, going through a book verse-by-verse, so that helps me a lot. That way I’m not just trying to come up with sermons, because if I know I’m preaching through a certain book, I know I’m going to have to have a sermon on that book on Sunday. Exposition with alliteration is my style.

WS: How often or long do you write each day?

DC: I write every day, and I have a process that I use. I read Scripture and if I want to develop a sermon, I use my computer now. I used to use a big ink pen with four colors, and I’ve got boxes of sermons with colored sermon outlines with a different color for each point. Then I adapted to the computer and now I’ve got all of that on the computer and have embraced it. I use Strong’s, my Bible, and a tool for alliteration.

WS: What’s your favorite Bible commentary?

In my ministry, I’ve had a lot of preachers ask this, and what I tell all of them is J. Vernon McGee’s Commentaries. What I like about him is that he covers every chapter, and they are simple and practical. I’m just simple and I just like simple stuff. But if I had to get rid of all my books in my library and keep one set it would be his.

WS: What is your favorite Bible translation?

I’m old school, I love the KJV just because I like the terminology and poetry, but I read a lot of different versions. I like the ESV, I don’t preach from it, but I study from it a lot. The reason I stick with the KJV is because it’s what I read when I was younger and what I memorized, so I’m familiar with it and just stuck with it over the years. 

Donald resides in Georgia with Denise, his wife of 33 years, and spends a lot of time with his grandbaby Kinsley.

Don’t miss our introductory sale on Cantrell’s new Bible Commentary Snapshots, along with 50 percent off all of his other works.

-Katie Cornett

5 Ways Bible Software Can Improve Your Ministry

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Even in this digital age of ebooks, many preachers still prepare sermons and lessons by researching dozens of paper books and Bibles in their library. Pastors often ask, “What are the main advantages of using Bible software?” The advantages are many, but here are 5 that stand out:

1. Bible software saves you time. With the fast topical and cross-reference searching features in Bible software, you can search your entire library for a single topic or verse in seconds. Instead of having to search through all of your books individually, imagine how powerful it is to search everything for exactly what you’re looking for by just typing and hitting “enter.” You can also quickly identify words linked to the original Greek and Hebrew using resources like Strong’s, leading to deeper understanding of each word.

2. Bible software saves you space. This might seem obvious, but with Bible software all you need is a computer or a mobile device. You can carry a seminary library on your laptop or device and access your content anywhere. This way, anywhere you are, if you need to access your library or look something up, it is as simple as grabbing your phone, tablet, or computer.

3. Bible software saves you money. With most Bible software, you can build a huge library of resources for a fraction of the cost of hard copies. More resources give you more content from prominent authors and pastors to help you improve your ministry to others.

4. Bible software gives you a new perspective in seconds. Quickly seeing the opinion of another pastor or scholar on the topic you’re studying can nudge you out of writer’s block. Scripture syncing features in Bible software can help you more quickly navigate to sermon content based on the Scripture you’re analyzing. This helps you see how others have outlined this Scripture, and how they have preached on that verse.

5. Bible software allows you to see things you’d miss otherwise. Bible software does cool things you can’t do any other way. For example, imagine clicking a button and seeing how the word “love” appears throughout all of Scripture, neatly displayed in a colorful bar graph. Imagine comparing 10 different Bible translations side by side, in perfect sync with one another.

With the help of powerful searching tools and access to more resources, including Bible dictionaries, surveys, commentaries, maps, and more, you can become a better student of God’s Word, which in turn helps you become a better teacher of God’s Word.

Originally posted on Pastors Today.