Quick Tip – Parallel Bibles

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The Parallel Bible window is the best way to compare multiple Bible translations. Comparing different translations can help you understand word and verse meanings, see the differences in the Hebrew and Greek interpretations, and get a better understanding of the Bible.

In WORDsearch you can:

  • Select any number of translations in the order you prefer
  • Display the translations in rows or columns
  • Reopen the window after closing back to your same translations
  • Search the Bibles directly from within the Parallel Window itself.

Needless to say, the Parallel Bible window is a powerful research tool.

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First, here’s a rundown of what each icon on the Parallel Bible window will do.

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parallel bibleBook/Chapter/Verse Navigation box

Using the Book/Chapter/Verse Navigation box, you can change the book, chapter, or verse displayed in your Parallel Bible window

parallel biblePrevious and Next Chapter buttons

Click to go to the beginning of the previous chapter in the Bible or the beginning of the next chapter in the Bible.

parallel bibleAdd Translation button

Click to add a new translation.

parallel bibleRow/Column button

Click to toggle between displaying the verses in rows and columns.

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Search box

Use this to search all Bibles in the Parallel window. Results will be shown with matches in red.

parallel bibleColumn width buttons

Use these buttons to control minimum column width.

parallel bibleSearch Results display mode buttons

Use these buttons to swap between displaying normal Bible text, search result verses only, and search results in context (result rows with additional scripture before and after).

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Link with other Scripture-Based Books button

The Link with other Scripture-Based Books button will synchronize one book to another.

parallel bibleTarget button

Clicking this button will make the Parallel window the recipient of all scripture hyperlinks.

Now that we’ve got the buttons down, how do we arrange the translations?

You can control the order that translations appear in two ways. The first method is to use the Add Translation dialog box:

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Select a Bible in the list on the right side of the window and click the Up or Down buttons to change its position in the list. The translation at the start of the list will be the first shown in the window.

The second way to reorder translations is by using drag-drop. Click in the header area to the right of any translation abbreviation, hold down the mouse button, and drag it to the new desired position, and release the mouse.

parallel bibleWith this Quick Tip, you are ready to go compare your favorite Bible translations. Have you learned anything from using parallel Bibles recently? Share with us in the comments below!

Related Posts:

Quick Tip – The Resource Window

Quick Tip – Finding a Book in Your Library

Quick Tip – Using Strong’s Numbers

Quick Tip – Searching

Quick Tip – 6 Tips for Highlighting

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When you highlight something in a hard copy of a book, it’s permanent. You have to be careful to make sure you highlight only what’s extremely important to you so you don’t ruin the book. That’s what so awesome about the highlighting feature in WORDsearch. With twelve different pen colors and two underline styles, you can highlight to your heart’s content – and remove at any time. You can also assign a legend to each color to create different meanings when you are reading. This can be especially helpful in precept type studying, or if in the long term you want to always mark mentions of the Holy Spirit as “blue underline.”

To get started, here’s the buttons we mention in this post.

wsbasichighlightHighlight Selected Text button

wsbasicdownThe Down Arrow button, next to the Highlight Selected Text button, allows you to select the style and color of the highlighter.

highlightcolorsThere are 12 different colors to select from. You can change the color of your highlighter to any one of these colors at any time.

Now, here are some simple tips to help you take advantage of this feature.

To choose between normal highlighting and underline highlighting:

1. Click the down arrow to show the highlighting menu and click on your desired style.

To highlight text
1. Use the cursor to select the text that you want to highlight; click and drag so that the text’s background indicates it is selected.
2. Click on the Highlight button (see below for what it looks like) on the toolbar.

To assign legend text
Click the down arrow to show the highlighting menu and click on “Edit Legends…” or click on the Options menu, select Settings, then select Highlighting.

To remove the highlight
1. Select the text you want to un-highlight.
2. Click on the Highlight button.

To extend the highlighted area
1. Click inside the highlighted area; hold down the left mouse button as you drag the mouse arrow outside the highlighted area.
2. Click on the Highlight button on the toolbar.

To change the text’s highlight color
1. Change the Highlight Pen color by clicking on the Down Arrow (see below)
2. Select the highlighted text.
3. Click on the Highlight button.

Have you set up a highlighting legend? Let us know in the comments below!

Quick Tip – The Resource Window

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The Resource Window is used to open any book or document in your WORDsearch library. By default it is pinned open, but it can also be set to auto-hide to give you more room for books on screen. Even when hidden, it is always partially visible on the left side of the WORDsearch program as a tall thin strip.

Opening the Resource Window

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The area outlined in red shows the Resource window in its closed state. Hover your mouse over or click in this area to open the Resource window. The Resource window will stay open until you move your mouse cursor to the right. Once your cursor is no longer over the Resource window it will hide itself.

Tip: If you find yourself accidentally opening the Resource window by moving your mouse over it when you don’t intend to, you can change its behavior so that it will only open when you click on it.

Pinning Open the Window

pinopenIf you want the Resource window to stay open, you can pin it open by using the thumbtack button in the upper right. In the picture to the left, the thumbtack has been outlined in red. Click once to “pin” the window open, click again to put the window into the mode in which it will hide itself once you move your cursor off the window.

Resource Toolbar

At the top of the window is a toolbar. You can use this toolbar to change the behavior of the Resource window.

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Use this button to access options.

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Use this Sections button to show or hide sections.

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Use this to filter books so that you can quickly find a book by title or author. To exit “filter mode” clear the text.

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Opening and Minimizing Sections

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To open or close a section you can click on the section header, or click the buttons outlined in red.

Clicking the “X” button removes a section from the Resource window entirely. If you change your mind and want to restore a section, click the Sections button in the Resource window toolbar (see above).


Expanding and Collapsing Folders

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Most sections in the Resource window have folders that are used to organize their contents. To open or close all folders in a section, use the plus and minus buttons in the section header.

There’s this week’s quick tip! Do you usually have your Resource window pinned open or hidden? Let us know in the comments below!

Quick Tip – Sort Through Thousands of Cross-References in Seconds

Depending on the size of your library, your WORDsearch books can contain thousands of references to Bible verses. If you want to study a specific verse of Scripture, it can seem overwhelming to even know where to begin.

The Cross-Reference Explorer shows you every single time a certain verse is found in every single one of your books. This is one of the most time-saving features of WORDsearch.

Let’s say you are doing a study on John 3:16. The Cross-Reference Explorer will search your entire library to show you every time John 3:16 is referenced. The best part? It only takes a few seconds.

First, click on the Cross-Reference Explorer icon to open up the tool. A few notes about the window that opens up:

  • The first bar at the top is where you choose the verse you want to search. Here we’ll use John 3:16. You can either type in the verse or use the drop-down to select, just like when you are navigating a Bible.
  • The little icon next to the verse chooser lets you arrange your windows either side-by-side or over/under. The usefulness of this icon depends on how many books you have open or what you determine to be more readable.
  • Just like in Bibles and commentaries, there is a sync icon. This comes in handy when you have a Bible or commentary open and want the Cross-Reference Explorer to follow your Bible navigation. If synced, the Cross-Reference Explorer will automatically update and find cross-references for whatever verse you are currently on. Pretty cool.
  • By default, the Cross-Reference Explorer will use all of your books, but you can also use a collection.

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Once we type John 3:16 into the verse chooser and hit enter, the results will display organized by book category. We can expand the categories in our results to see which books reference the verse, and we can expand individual books to see the different places within the book that reference the verse and how many times.

The results show us that John 3:16 is mentioned 31 times in the Bible Knowledge Commentary and in five devotionals in Daily Light on the Daily Path.

The red parentheses show how many references are in that section of the book. From there, you can click on any of the results to read more, or open the book in a new window for further study.

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Can you imagine trying to do this in your printed books? It would take a long time. With the Cross-Reference Explorer, it takes a few seconds. The Cross-Reference Explorer is a powerful and easy tool to find critical notes, historical and cultural information, and insights from others on God’s Word. Whether you want to see where the verse appears in your different texts or you want to build out your sermon, it can help you find any Bible verse, anywhere in your WORDsearch library.

Let us know how the Cross-Reference Explorer has helped you in your study in the comments below!

Quick Tips – Narrow Your Search with Topic Explorer

The Topic Explorer in WORDsearch is a powerful tool that searches your entire library for a single subject in seconds. Instead of searching every word of every book for your search term, the Topic Explorer narrows your search by looking only at the the titles of articles and chapters that include or are related to your search term. Imagine searching the subject indexes of all of your books in an instant, and you’ll have imagined the Topic Explorer.

Let’s say we want to teach a lesson or create a sermon on the broad topic of “love.” First, we’ll click on the Topic Explorer icon to open the window.

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There are two different types of searches we can do with the Topic Explorer. The first and fastest type, “At beginning of topic,” looks only at the first word in our subject indices for our search term. The second and more thorough type, “Anywhere in topic,” searches every word in our subject indices for our search term.

Let’s look at how to get the shorter list first. To do this, we’ll follow these steps:

  1. Type “love” in the Search for: bar at the top of the Topic Explorer window
  2. Choose “At the beginning of topic” from the Find topic text drop down option
  3. Select a collection of books to search or choose to search all books
  4. Click the search button

As expected, all of our results start with the word “love,” because we chose to find only the index entries that begin with the word “love.”

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For the second type of search we can do, we follow the same instructions as above, but choose “Anywhere in topic” in step two, we’ll see a longer list of results. For example, our search results now include “Beloved Disciple,” “Brotherly Love,” “Family of Love,” and more. This is because we chose to find index entries that include the word “love” anywhere within them.

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When we click on the plus sign next to one of our search results, for example, the “Beloved Disciple”, we’re shown the book that includes the topic (sometimes there is more than one). From there, we can click on the entry in the book to read what the book says. If we want to continue reading a particular entry in a new window,we can click on the button “Open in new window”.

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The Topic Explorer defaults to sorting our results by Topic alphabetically, but we can also sort our results alphabetically by book title or book category (i.e., location). Another helpful feature within the Topic Explorer is the red level button. When we click this button and then expand a topic, book, or category, every sub-folder underneath that topic, book, or category will also be expanded, so we don’t have to keep clicking through the levels to get to our results.

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The Topic Explorer is one of our favorite features of WORDsearch, because it makes finding relevant material so easy and so efficient.

Have you made an exciting or surprising discovery because of the Topic Explorer tool lately? We’d love to hear about it in our comments below!

The Pastor/Teacher’s Toolkit – Syncing Sermons

pastor/teacher's toolkit, wordsearch bible, sermonsSometimes, when creating a sermon, writer’s block hits, or the specific point you want to make seems to elude you, or you have trouble outlining your sermon. Have you ever wished you could see the opinion of another pastor on the topic you’re studying to help nudge you over the block?

WORDsearch publishes sermons from prominent preachers, and reading them can give you training from some of the best preachers in the world, past and present. Recently, we updated our published sermons to make them sync with Scripture. This helps you more quickly navigate to sermon content based on the Scripture you’re analyzing. This helps you see how the preacher divided up Scripture, and how they preached on that verse.

Let’s say I have my HCSB and Bible Knowledge Commentary opened and synced to Mark 6, where Jesus is rejected in Nazareth. In my commentary, I get background information about how far Jesus traveled to get to His hometown and who was with Him.  In verse 2 where the people ask, “What is this wisdom given to Him, and how are these miracles performed by His hands?” the BKC explains how their tone was disparaging and that they were offended. And that’s when writer’s block hits. How do I write a sermon about this?

Leaving my Bible and BKC open, I open up Wells of Living Water, a collection of sermons by Robert E. Neighbor. It immediately opens to Mark 6, because it’s syncing with my opened Bible. Here I find a sermon titled “How Unbelief Hindered Christ.” There are multiple parts of this sermon, with topics that could easily be split into a sermon series. Some of them include “Holding Jesus of Nazareth Down to a Human Genealogy,” “Making it Impossible for Christ to Do Mighty Works,” and “Marveling at Their Unbelief.” It also provides an illustration Neighbor personally used to help bring the point across.

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I can easily open up another set of sermons and navigate to Mark 6 to see if it contains any messages on that verse. Also, as I progress through Mark 6, the sermon follows along with anything it says about the verse I’m clicking on.

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Reading Neighbor’s words reinvigorates my enthusiasm for the text and fills me with fresh ideas on how to present it.  I decide I like the focus on the unbelief in these verses and how Jesus was not able to do any miracles in His hometown because they didn’t believe in Him. I craft my outline, add my ownl illustration of unbelief, and use WORDsearch to find other stories of how active faith allowed Jesus to do amazing things.

Scripture-synced sermons allows you to find great ideas by some of history’s finest preachers with the click of a button. As a result, your sermon prep time is greatly reduced. This is an excellent way to find fresh inspiration from renowned preachers and their sermons. And syncing makes it easier than ever to find just the material you’re looking for.

If you own any of these sermons sets already, simply go to Help, Check for Book Updates, then choose the sermons you want to update. This added functionality is free!

For more tips, don’t miss out on the other posts in the Pastor/Teacher’s Toolkit series, Bible Dictionaries and Bible Surveys.