Quick Tips – Desktops

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A Desktop in WORDsearch is like having a stack of study tools (as mentioned in our Guest Post – Stacks) for different needs you might have. You can set up multiple Desktops and have the books you use the most saved open, ready to go. For example, you can have a “Morning Devotional” Desktop set up with your daily devotional and your favorite Bible opened. Then you can open your “Sermon Creation” Desktop, where you have your most used commentaries and Word Study tools, along with parallel Bibles set up. Each desktop is like a separate copy of WORDsearch, and each keeps track of highlighting, personal notes, open books, and preferences. Everything you do in your Desktop is kept separate from work done in all other Desktops. Desktops are also a great tool to use for multiple family members. Each person can have separate preferences and active study sessions.

Now that we understand the benefits of having different Desktops, let’s go through the steps to create, manage, and open Desktops.

Some notes to know first:

  • The first time you start WORDsearch you will automatically have a Desktop created called “My Desktop.”
  • WORDsearch automatically updates your Desktop as you use the program, so you don’t have to remember to save your changes before exiting. You can even leave windows open when you exit, and they will be restored them the next time you run WORDsearch.
  • When you create a new Desktop, it is totally empty and has no highlighting, personal notes, or open windows carried over from the previously active Desktop.

How to Create a New Desktop

Desktops Icons

1. From the File menu, click on Create Desktop, or click on the Desktop button on the main tool bar and select Create Desktop. 


Desktop

2. In the Create New Desktop dialog box that appears, enter a name for your Desktop. For example, “Sermon Creation.”

3.  You can choose to create a new desktop using the default settings or using the settings from the current Desktop. Settings include preferred books and Preferences.

4. Click on the OK button.

How to Manage Your Desktops

Desktops Icons

1. Click on the Desktops button located on the Tool Bar.

Manage Desktop

2. Click on the Manage Desktops menu item.

3. The Manage Desktops window will open.

How to Open a Desktop

Desktops Icons

1. Click on the Desktop button located on the toolbar on the Main window.

Manage Desktop

2. Click on the name of the desktop found on the drop down menu that you would like to open.

That’s it! What are the name’s of your different Desktops? Share with us in the comments below!

Guest Post – Stacks

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A pastor once joked about what he is paid to do.

He said he is not paid to preach because that is what he loves and is gifted to do.

He said he is not paid to minister to people because God called him and put that heart within him.

He then paused and with a grin said, “I am paid to put up with that daggum staff!”

For the record I love my staff and most of the pastors I know love their own. Many of the pastors who do not yet have staff would give their right arm to have some paid help. So my point is not to pick on church staff. My point is to point out how much we love to preach. We would do it for free.

Every pastor I know loves to preach. This is why WORDsearch is such a blessing. While other Bible study software suites are built for students, WORDsearch is built for preachers who want to study. There is a difference.

One of the features I have verbally thanked God for is called Desktops. Before WORDsearch I would have a couple of different stacks of books on my desk. I would have a stack I was using for the Sunday morning series with a few commentaries and other resources. I would have a stack for the Wednesday evening series that included a few books but also some scholarly articles. If I was in the middle of a discipleship series there would be a stack for that.

When I would head to the coffee shop for study those stacks would come with me. If I needed to do a little reading at home, the stacks would come as well. These stacks plus my laptop, tablet, notebook, pens, wall charger, and Bible would make a simple trip to the coffee shop quite a challenge; keeping them in order, protecting the pages from bends and spills. Not fun at all.

Inevitably I would lessen the load by trying to decide which books I would take. After being at my study location for less than an hour I would have read through what I brought and was wishing I had brought more.

With WORDsearch this is no longer a problem.

First of all my stack are now Desktops. I have a desktop for Sermon Prep, one for Wednesday Study, another for Language Tools (Word Study), and yet another I simply call My Desktop. The latter is the one I open if I am just wanting to look something up quickly or explore a side topic.

Each one is preset to the books and types of books I need for that particular effort. For instance right now on my Sermon Prep Desktop I have 10 complete multi-volume commentary sets, four Bibles (parallel Bibles, cross-reference tools), and four theological dictionaries. Imagine lugging that to the coffee shop. And that is just one desktop.

Second, I am not limited to that one desktop or stack of books. I can easily switch over to the Word Study desktop or Wednesday Study with two clicks and I am ready to go. Not only with the books I stacked on that desktop but also my complete library waiting in the wings.

Not to mention the incredibly convenient way each book can be synced. I turn to a text in my Bible and all of the open resources turn to that same text. Cutting out minutes of page flipping and letting me spend that time on actual research.

I hear friends talk all the time about having print books and loving the nostalgia of the physical text. I get that, however those things are heavy and limited. Take a break from the staff, head to the coffee shop, and take your entire library with you organized in neat stacks ready to be read with WORDsearch.

Josh KingJosh King is the Lead Pastor at Sachse’s Church (Sax-ee) in North East Dallas County. He has Bible/ministry degrees from Criswell College and Liberty Seminary. He and his wife Jacki have two sons and are expecting the third (from Ethiopia) in the next few months (hopefully). 

Saturday’s Roundup

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“I have downsized my library thanks to WORDsearch. I also have access to it from anywhere.” 

“Ease of use and the sync feature means every book open comes to same Scripture for reference!” 

“Portability, faster searching, lower cost.” 

“For the powerful tools, ease of use, and the massive amounts of information at my fingertips.”

Happy November roundup readers! The quotes above are just a few of the responses we received when we asked you the number one reason to use Bible software on Facebook. It was fun to hear how our work helps you in your ministry, and we are so grateful for your participation! If you haven’t liked us on Facebook yet, what are you waiting for? Join the conversation!

Anyway, back to the reasons for using Bible software. This week here at WORDsearch, we were pretty excited to get published on LifeWay’s Pastors Today site. Have you checked it out yet? There are articles covering all kinds of topics related to the work you do in ministry, including ours this week, 5 Ways Bible Software Can Improve Your MinistryBesides that, here’s what else you might have missed at WORDsearch this week.

Spurgeon: More Prolific in Preaching, Writing, Studying, and Bible Scholarship than Most Anyone Who Ever Lived

Did you know that the most complete collection of Charles H. Spurgeon, the “Prince of Preachers,” is available from WORDsearch? The sheer volume of his work is astonishing considering he died at 57. Driven by the Holy Spirit with a passion to preach, he was wise beyond his years. The material he left in the form of published works has been a tremendous blessing to students of the Word.

Our Spurgeon Collection contains 91 volumes on prayer, church, church growth, Bible history, culture, sermons, theology, and more. You’ll even get to know Spurgeon better with the 14 biographies in this set, including his own autobiography.

Exposition with alliteration is my style.” Donald L. Cantrell’s New Commentary Snapshots

Donald Cantrell is one of our most popular authors. He knows how to jump-start your thinking by offering beautifully alliterated outlines for preaching and teaching. “Each outline is offered as a kind of seed, something that can be planted in your heart as you serve the Lord,” he says. “Of course, these seeds have the potential of blossoming into full blown sermons, and I hope some of them do so in your ministry.”

His new Bible Commentary Snapshots cover the gospels through Acts, along with a bonus Christmas volume. You’ll also find that all of Cantrell’s other works are 50 percent off!

Reminders:

The All Series sale ends Monday.

Blog Posts You Might Have Missed This Week from WORDsearch

5 Ways Bible Software Can Improve Your Ministry – Also Posted on Pastors Today

Pressured Pastor? Read Donald Cantrell’s Content Creation Tips

P.S. Don’t forget that Daylight Savings Time ends tomorrow, so set your clocks back one hour. Have a great weekend.

Free Friday! Thy Will Be Done

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Happy Friday everyone! Today’s free download, usually $4.95, is Thy Will Be Done by Andrew Murray. Click here to download.

The glory and the blessedness of heaven consist in nothing but this, that God’s will is done there in and by all. There is nothing to hinder God’s working freely and fully all His blessed will in its countless hosts. To all that He wills for them of goodness and blessedness and service their whole being is surrendered in submission and adoration. God lives in them and they in God. They are filled with the fullness of God.

Come walk with Andrew Murray for 30 days of daily devotionals and discover more about the blessed will of God and how to conform your will to His will. Written in brief chapters, the words of this godly man will surely encourage, stir, and move you to promptly find and do the sweet will of God.

Andrew Murray Jr. was born in Cape Town, South Africa in 1828. He was the second child of Andrew Murray Sr., a Scottish Presbyterian serving the Dutch Reformed Church of South Africa as a missionary. Andrew was sent to Aberdeen in Scotland for his initial education together with his elder brother, John. Both remained there until they obtained their M.A in 1845. From there they both went to the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands where they studied theology. Both brothers were ordained by the Hague Committee of the Dutch Reformed Church on May 9, 1848 and returned to the Cape.

Andrew pastored churches in Bloemfontein, Worcester, Cape Town and Wellington, all in South Africa. He was an amazingly prolific Christian author. All of his publications were originally written in Dutch and then translated into English. As his popularity grew, Murray’s books found their way into more than twelve foreign languages during his lifetime alone. Murray is best known for his devotional writings, which place great emphasis on the need for a rich, personal devotional life. Several of his books have become classics, including:Abide in Christ, Absolute Surrender and Waiting on God.

He helped to found what are now the University College of the Orange Free State and the Stellenbosch Seminary. He served as moderator of the Cape Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church and was president of both the YMCA and the South African General Mission, now the Africa Evangelical Fellowship.

Murray was an alert and intense man. He died on January 18, 1917 – four months before his eighty-ninth birthday. For his contribution to world missions, he was given an honorary doctorate by the universities of Aberdeen and Cape of Good Hope

After you have read the book, we would love to hear what you thought in the Customer Reviews box on the bottom of the book’s page.

Get to Know Donald Cantrell

donald cantrellDonald Cantrell has been a preacher of the gospel since 1980. His goal in writing books is to be helpful to ministers who may need a simple thought to prompt them in developing a mighty message. His hope is to be practical, preachable, and accessible to the busy and pressured pastor.

In addition to preaching and writing, Donald has been active in personal sermon consulting and research, offering help with individual sermon development, subject research, Bible character studies, and sermon series. He has also helped various pastorates with the leading of revivals.

With the new release of his Bible Commentary Snapshots on WORDsearch today, we talked with the Florida Gators fan about his alliteration style, preaching, and his writing process.

WORDsearch: Where did you get the idea for this series?

Donald Cantrell: I have people contact me all the time from around the world, asking for advice. I like mentoring and helping people, that’s the primary goal. In the SBC in Georgia, the high majority of people are bivocational, and me doing this can help save them time.

I’ve always developed sermons and done alliteration, but then I started thinking what I wanted to do was come up with something catchy that would give a pastor or preacher something they could take straight to the puplit or develop into a full sermon on their own. I really liked the term “sermon snapshots.” I thought about it for a few days and really think it describes the material I create for a preacher.

 WS: What would you say is different in this work from your other works?

DC: This one I will try to do every verse in the New Testament and make sure every verse has an outline, or part of an outline, and that it’s alliterated. So far I’ve got Matthew- Acts, and I  just got done with 50 Christmas snapshots.

WS: What is your process in creating content? How do you get started?

DC: My main process is to first read the Scripture and then I like to think about it. Then I do my three or four main points, alliterate them, but very simply. Then I try to develop my main thoughts. Here’s how I look at it: I look at it like at first minimum alliteration, then once I have my main thoughts I go back and change and adapt it, then when it’s all said and done, my whole outline is all done, and I have what I call maximum alliteration. Alliteration is my thing, I’ve always been able to do it once I’ve started.

WS: How do you choose the verses or topics you cover?

DC: Well, I’m a pastor and I design sermons for my church also. If I get into something I really like at my church, I might just make a whole series out of it and offer it to pastors.

WS: How do you come up with your sermons?

DC: I like to do expository preaching, going through a book verse-by-verse, so that helps me a lot. That way I’m not just trying to come up with sermons, because if I know I’m preaching through a certain book, I know I’m going to have to have a sermon on that book on Sunday. Exposition with alliteration is my style.

WS: How often or long do you write each day?

DC: I write every day, and I have a process that I use. I read Scripture and if I want to develop a sermon, I use my computer now. I used to use a big ink pen with four colors, and I’ve got boxes of sermons with colored sermon outlines with a different color for each point. Then I adapted to the computer and now I’ve got all of that on the computer and have embraced it. I use Strong’s, my Bible, and a tool for alliteration.

WS: What’s your favorite Bible commentary?

In my ministry, I’ve had a lot of preachers ask this, and what I tell all of them is J. Vernon McGee’s Commentaries. What I like about him is that he covers every chapter, and they are simple and practical. I’m just simple and I just like simple stuff. But if I had to get rid of all my books in my library and keep one set it would be his.

WS: What is your favorite Bible translation?

I’m old school, I love the KJV just because I like the terminology and poetry, but I read a lot of different versions. I like the ESV, I don’t preach from it, but I study from it a lot. The reason I stick with the KJV is because it’s what I read when I was younger and what I memorized, so I’m familiar with it and just stuck with it over the years. 

Donald resides in Georgia with Denise, his wife of 33 years, and spends a lot of time with his grandbaby Kinsley.

Don’t miss our introductory sale on Cantrell’s new Bible Commentary Snapshots, along with 50 percent off all of his other works.

-Katie Cornett

5 Ways Bible Software Can Improve Your Ministry

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Even in this digital age of ebooks, many preachers still prepare sermons and lessons by researching dozens of paper books and Bibles in their library. Pastors often ask, “What are the main advantages of using Bible software?” The advantages are many, but here are 5 that stand out:

1. Bible software saves you time. With the fast topical and cross-reference searching features in Bible software, you can search your entire library for a single topic or verse in seconds. Instead of having to search through all of your books individually, imagine how powerful it is to search everything for exactly what you’re looking for by just typing and hitting “enter.” You can also quickly identify words linked to the original Greek and Hebrew using resources like Strong’s, leading to deeper understanding of each word.

2. Bible software saves you space. This might seem obvious, but with Bible software all you need is a computer or a mobile device. You can carry a seminary library on your laptop or device and access your content anywhere. This way, anywhere you are, if you need to access your library or look something up, it is as simple as grabbing your phone, tablet, or computer.

3. Bible software saves you money. With most Bible software, you can build a huge library of resources for a fraction of the cost of hard copies. More resources give you more content from prominent authors and pastors to help you improve your ministry to others.

4. Bible software gives you a new perspective in seconds. Quickly seeing the opinion of another pastor or scholar on the topic you’re studying can nudge you out of writer’s block. Scripture syncing features in Bible software can help you more quickly navigate to sermon content based on the Scripture you’re analyzing. This helps you see how others have outlined this Scripture, and how they have preached on that verse.

5. Bible software allows you to see things you’d miss otherwise. Bible software does cool things you can’t do any other way. For example, imagine clicking a button and seeing how the word “love” appears throughout all of Scripture, neatly displayed in a colorful bar graph. Imagine comparing 10 different Bible translations side by side, in perfect sync with one another.

With the help of powerful searching tools and access to more resources, including Bible dictionaries, surveys, commentaries, maps, and more, you can become a better student of God’s Word, which in turn helps you become a better teacher of God’s Word.

Originally posted on Pastors Today.