Bible Translation Day

bible translation day

The Bible in our language is something we can take for granted easily. All most of us reading this have to do is pick up our Bible or open WORDsearch and we are reading the Word of God.

Many people groups still don’t have a translation in their own language. Around 180 million people, or 1,900 languages, need Bible translation to begin (wycliffe.org). Having a translation in their own tongue is important in that trying to read Scripture in another language that isn’t their first can limit their understanding. The gospel in their own language can reach into their hearts and change their lives.

Bible translation is hard and long work. In 1966 the Senate passed the resolution for a Bible Translation Day, wanting to honor that work.

Today we can stop and pray for this powerful work that still isn’t finished. We can pray for:

  • The workers, thanking God for them and all that they do for the Kingdom. Pray that they would not burn out or want to quit, for renewed energy and passion for their important tasks.
  • The remaining people groups that don’t have their own translations, that the Lord would provide the necessary workers to make that translation a reality. Also that the Lord would protect them and give them a longing for the gospel, preparing their hearts for transformation.
  • The translations themselves – that they would maintain the integrity of God’s Word.

The Word of God is what we study, base our lives around, and love. Let’s be grateful for what the Lord has provided for us today and everyday, while remembering those who don’t have this privilege yet.

For the word of God is living and effective and sharper than any double-edged sword,penetrating as far as the separation of soul and spirit, joints and marrow. It is able to judge the ideas and thoughts of the heart.” – Hebrews 4:12

(Prayer ideas from wycliffe.org)

What’s your favorite Bible translation? Let us know in the comments below!

-Katie Cornett

Guest Post – Are You Growing in Grace and Knowledge?

2 peter

Please note: The views & opinions expressed in any guest post featured on our site are those of the guest author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions & views of LifeWay Christian Resources.

2 Peter 3:18 is an interesting ending to Peter’s last letter to the Christians before he is crucified for the sake of the gospel. Peter tells the people to continue to grow in grace and knowledge. Of all the things he could have ended with, he emphasizes growth.

Growing is an interesting concept. We can gain understanding when we consider our natural growth process. Who looks the same as they did when they were a newborn baby? Growth demands change. Why do we accept the growth pains of a child but consider suffering for Christ a negative thing? Growth occurs in discomfort.

Peter was not someone unfamiliar with change or discomfort. He denied knowing Jesus three times during the time when everyone forsook Jesus in the face of fear. Peter was later crucified for refusing to deny the message of Christ he proclaimed to the world. Peter changed from cowardice to courageous.

Following his failed opportunities to stand up for the living Christ, Jesus sees him out fishing. Jesus calls to this group from afar, and they do not need to test Jesus to see if it is really him. This time they know, unlike the earlier storm in the middle of the night when Peter walked on water until he doubted.

Instantly, Peter jumps overboard. Peter thought he wouldn’t have a chance to see Jesus again after he denied him three times. He couldn’t contain himself and needed to get to Jesus now.

I think Peter halfway expected to run on the water, but rather, this time, he swam to Jesus. And the lengthy swim to find his reconciliation with Christ was so sweet, like a dash for the Olympic gold medal.

You see, Peter wasn’t far away from Christ, but walked daily with Christ. In the midst of his daily walk with Christ, he still needed to change. Peter experienced this truth firsthand; therefore, he explains that we should experience certain growth in our individual lives as we continue to walk with Christ:

For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with goodness, goodness with knowledge, knowledge with self-control, self-control with endurance, endurance with godliness, godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love. - 2 Peter 1:5-7

This growth is of incredible importance to our walk with Christ. Most of us have heard the phrase, “if you’re not growing, then you’re dying.” Peter explains that if we aren’t experiencing growth, if we are not going through change, then we are not being of use to the Master Jesus Christ. Our knowledge and “faith” is of little importance if we are not growing and seeing these aspects of character increasing in our lives.

For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they will keep you from being useless or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. The person who lacks these things is blind and shortsighted and has forgotten the cleansing from his past sins. Therefore, brothers, make every effort to confirm your calling and election, because if you do these things you will never stumble. For in this way, entry into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ will be richly supplied to you. - 2 Peter 1:8-11

Are you seeing the fruit of God’s Spirit show up in your life? Are you changing into more of Christ?

May grace and peace be multiplied to you through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord. - 2 Peter 1:2

bradandresBrad Andres helps people understand the Bible and maximize their God-given potential for life. He is the author of The Scripture Reader’s Manifesto and lives in Sandusky, Ohio with his wife and daughter. To get more of Brad’s thoughts, check out his website at BradAndres.com, find him on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or circle him on Google+.

 

Saturday’s Roundup

roundup, wordsearch

Please tell me when you’ll have the Word Biblical Commentary!” Well folks, it’s here! This whole week here at WORDsearch was focused on getting the WBC released and out to you, and we are so grateful for your patience! In case you missed it, here are some more details, along with what else you might have missed this week.

The Word Biblical Commentary – Unmatched Level of Precise Scholarship

The WBC is one of our most requested resources, and for good reason. It is highly regarded by pastors, preachers, teachers, and the academic community. Each commentator was chosen for his specific area of expertise, and you’ll experience this by the unmatched level of precise scholarship. Most commentaries tend to have a dominant focus that will be expositional, critical, summary, application, homiletical, or devotional. With the WBC, you get all of that in one commentary. The best part? For a limited time this set is available for $299.95, (aka only $5.17 a volume) so don’t miss this opportunity!

Enhance Your Understanding of the Bible – New Study Bibles

Another common request has been fulfilled this week – the excellent HCSB Study Bible content has been formatted for two more translations, the KJV and NKJV. All the maps, photos, illustrations, charts, articles, and word studies that make the HCSB Study Bible so popular are included.  In WORDsearch, Study Bible Notes can be used with any translation, but with this content, the difference is any time a verse is quoted in the study material, it will be quoted in the translation of your preference.

Oh, and don’t forget there are only a few days left to get the Adrian Rogers videos. After October 2, they will no longer be offered for sale.

Blog Posts You Might Have Missed This Week from WORDsearch

“There is, and has been a narcissistic obsession and love affair with self that cannot be denied” – Guest Post: Did You Know that Selfie Is in the Bible?

Create a Deeper Sermon or Lesson with The Pastor/Teacher’s Toolkit – Cross-Reference Explorer

“Never Stop Praying” & See You At the Pole 2014

Have a great weekend, and remember, don’t miss any news or updates by liking us on Facebook or following us on Twitter. And don’t forget we are also on Pinterest if you ever need inspiration or recipes.

Free Friday! Christ’s Glorious Achievements

spurgeon, gloriousHappy Friday everyone! Today’s free download, usually $4.95, is Christ’s Glorious Achievements by Charles Haddon Spurgeon.
download_button

But our Lord’s obedience was as deep as it was broad, for his zeal to do the will of him that sent him consumed him. He says himself, ‘I delight to do thy will, O my God, yea thy law is within my heart.’ Such righteousness he puts upon all believers. ‘By the obedience of one shall many be made righteous’; righteous to the full; perfect in Christ. We rejoice to wear the costly robe of fair white linen which Jesus has prepared, and we feel that we may stand arrayed in it before the Majesty of heaven without a trembling thought. This is something to dwell upon, dear friends. Only as righteous ones can we be saved, but Jesus Christ makes us righteous, and therefore we are saved. He is righteous who believeth on him, even as Abraham believed God and it was counted unto him for righteousness. 

The popular view of Christianity today is a list of rules. Do’s and Don’t seems to be what it is all about. But if that’s what we think Christianity is all about then we have a lot to learn. The key to understanding Christianity is not something we have to do, but rather something that Jesus Christ has already achieved on our behalf.

Christ’s Glorious Achievements, by one of the most influential Christians of the last 200 years, looks at what Christ has done for us. Read it and then ask yourself the question “If Christ has done all this for me, is anything I am asked to do for Christ too much in return?”

Few people in history can be known by one name and have it ring true with their audience, and “Spurgeon” is one of them. Over time, Spurgeon has become known and revered as the “Prince of Preachers“. In the last 200 years he has been one of the most influential men for not only Preachers of the Gospel but for those who have not had the opportunity to hear and receive the Gospel message. He wrote tirelessly over his life, and WORDsearch Bible Software is committed to bring as many of Spurgeon’s works as possible to you in electronic form.

After you have read the book, we would love to hear what you thought in the Customer Reviews box on the bottom of the book’s page. And don’t miss our big news concerning Spurgeon hereHave you read anything that has inspired you lately? Let us know!

See You At the Pole – Never Stop Praying

american-flag-in-the-wind_w490_h346Today Christian students across the country gathered to pray for See You at the Pole™, part of the Global Week of Student Prayer. Since its start in 1990, See You at the Pole has been all about uniting students to pray for their generation. This year’s theme is “Never Stop Praying,” with students interceding for their school, family, friends, and communities.

Even if we aren’t students, we can still participate in and learn from this event. We can pray for the students—that by and through their united prayer, they would witness to non-Christians. We can pray in thanksgiving for the freedom to still participate in this prayer at schools. We can pray for our government, especially with all of the decisions they are currently having to make regarding ISIS and the Ebola outbreak. We can pray for the missionaries and our persecuted brothers and sisters, who are currently suffering for their faith and testimony.

First of all, then, I urge that petitions, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for everyone, for kings and all those who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity. This is good, and it pleases God our Savior,  who wants everyone to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.” – 1 Timothy 2: 1-4

And like the theme of See You at the Pole encourages, let’s never stop praying.

-Katie Cornett

The Pastor/Teacher’s Toolkit – Cross-Reference Explorer

toolkit, cross-ref explorer

One of the best ways to interpret Scripture is by using Scripture, or in other words, using cross-references. In the Bible there are around 340,000 cross-references (OpenBible.info) that can help you explore the unity and common themes between the Old and New Testaments. On top of biblical cross-referencing, WORDsearch can help you explore your entire library to find mentions of the verse you are looking for to help you build out a sermon or lesson.

As we saw with the last Quick Tip, one of the most time-saving features of WORDsearch is the Cross-Reference Explorer. The Cross-Reference Explorer is a powerful and easy tool to find critical notes, historical and cultural information, and insights from others on God’s Word.

Let’s take a deeper look into how to use Cross-Reference Explorer when creating a sermon or lesson.

Let’s say we are creating a sermon on the baptism of Jesus, what it meant, and where it is alluded to in the Old Testament.

If you open a Bible open to Matthew 3:13-17, verse 16 states, “This is My beloved Son. I take delight in Him!” we can easily see the biblical cross-references by clicking on the little number 4 in brackets. This means there are four other Scripture references related to the verse. From this, we see that John 12:28 and Luke 9:35 also mention Jesus’ baptism, showing us that it must be significant.

We also get two Old Testament references with Psalm 2:7 and Isaiah 42:1.

cross reference explorer

Now that we have our cross-reference verses, we can see what the other books in our library have to say about them. Let’s say we want to know more about the cross-reference of Isaiah 42:1 first.

Open the Cross-Reference Explorer and type in Isaiah 42:1.

cross-ref_2

Here we see many references to the verse, but we’re interested in the ones that specifically relate to Matthew 3:17. After reading a few entries, we can go back and type in Matthew 3:17 in the search bar to go back to our original verse.

Here are just a few things we can learn:

  • In the Bible Background Commentary, we learn how Matthew writes his gospel this way so that his readers would see allusions “not only to Psalm 2:7,” which we saw earlier as a cross-reference, but “also to the suffering servant of Isaiah 42:1-4.”
  • Isaiah 42:1, we’re informed,  is a fulfilled Messianic prophecy of the Messiah being filled with the Holy Spirit.
  • Matthew Henry Concise explains that Jesus’ baptism shows the full Trinity at work — Jesus the man, the Holy Spirit descending, and God the Father speaking.
  • In Wells of Living Water from a sermon titled the “Preaching and Baptism of John”, we discover an application of how to apply this message to the audience personally. How important is baptism to us?
  • Instead of searching through all the topics in my Sermon Help Illustration books, using the Cross-Reference Explorer, we can find two illustrations mentioning Matthew 3:17 in 6,000 Plus Illustrations for Communicating Biblical Truths, one bringing to light the importance of Fathers telling their children, “You’re mine,” to help them feel secure.

With all of this information, I can structure my sermon around how the Old Testament points to Christ, the importance of His baptism, and the importance of baptism for us. By understanding the Old Testament allusions to this event, we gain a much richer knowledge of the New Testament. Using the Cross-Reference Explorer, you can craft a much fuller and deeper sermon.

What is your favorite part of using Cross-Reference Explorer? Share with us in the comments below!