Free Friday! Words of Counsel for Christian Workers

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Happy Friday everyone! Today’s free download, usually $4.95, is Words of Counsel for Christian Workers by Charles H. Spurgeon. Click here to download.

We ought to remember that we are the messengers of God’s mercy to the sons of men. “The Lord being merciful unto him.” The angels had not come to Lot of themselves; they were the embodiment and outward display of God’s mercy. Christians in the world should view themselves as manifestations of God’s mercy to sinners, instruments of grace, servants of the Holy Spirit. Now mercy is a nimble attribute. Justice lingers; it is shod with lead, but the feet of mercy are winged. Mercy delights to perform its office. So should it be with us a delight to do good to men. God can save men without instruments, but He very seldom does it. His usual rule is to work by means. Oh that the mercy of God would work mightily by us! Let us remember, as we mingle with society, that God has committed to us the ministry of reconciliation.

Although the Prince of Preachers Charles Haddon Spurgeon lived before the advent of the modern emphasis on psychology and counseling, he had deep insights into mental and spiritual elements of mankind. He experienced many of the trials of life that others encounter, both mentally and physically. In Words of Counsel for Christian Workers, Spurgeon writes about “hard work and its reward”, “workers reading to profit”, “saving a soul from death”, “restoring those who have erred”, “a great leader and good soldiers”, etc.

Few people in history can be known by one name and have it ring true with their audience, and “Spurgeon” is one of them. Over time, Spurgeon has become known and revered as the “Prince of Preachers“. In the last 200 years he has been one of the most influential men for not only Preachers of the Gospel but for those who have not had the opportunity to hear and receive the Gospel message. He wrote tirelessly over his life, and WORDsearch Bible Software is committed to bring as many of Spurgeon’s works as possible to you in electronic form. It is estimated that over his lifetime he preached to over 10,000,000 people.

After you have read the book, we would love to hear what you thought in the Customer Reviews box on the bottom of the book’s page.

Have you read anything that has inspired you lately? Share with us in the comments below!

Guest Post – The Ripple Effect of Ministry

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A former middle school youth group student of mine recently emailed me. He thanked me for demonstrating a faith in God that he still admires and is emulating in his own ministry calling. His words humbled me because I was new to ministry at that time and constantly making mistakes. But I am very grateful to him because sometimes we don’t know when God has used us to change someone’s life.

This concept hit me hard at a youth summer camp of 2007, and it continues to be one of the most important personal ministry experiences of my life. My group of students had been partnered with kids from another church all week long as they participated in Bible studies and field games. On the last day of camp the students from the other church were all wearing the same t-shirt with the words, “In Memory of…” on the front.

So I sat down with a group of them that day and asked them about the t-shirts. The oldest student explained that their youth pastor had died of a heart attack a couple of months before the camp had started. Without a leader, a group of high school students decided that camp was so important for the middle school students that they took it upon themselves to make sure that the summer camp trip was not canceled.

I was completely blown away by their story because I became aware of the ripple effect of ministry. Every Bible study I prepared, every prayer I spoke, every worship song I sang, every special event I planned… everything I did in ministry had the potential to impact the life of someone in a way I would never know.

The ripple effect can be observed in the ministry of Jesus when He encounters the Samaritan woman at the well in Sychar. After spending time with her and testifying He was the Messiah, she left and began witnessing throughout the city. The gospel John shares, “Now many Samaritans from that town believed in Him because of what the woman said when she testified, ‘He told me everything I ever did.’” John 4:39 (HCSB)

Remember this in your day-to-day ministry – that even if it feels like you aren’t making a difference, God can be using you in ways you’d never even dream. Be encouraged by these words.

Brandon OrtegaBrandon Ortega currently works for WORDsearch Bible. He is passionate about youth ministry, writing, and playing the guitar. He is a graduate of San Diego Christian College with a degree in Biblical studies with an emphasis in youth ministry.

Free Friday! The Way to God

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Happy Friday everyone! Today’s free download, usually $7.95, is The Way to God by Dwight Lyman Moody. Click here to download.

I believe the reason why a great many people think God does not love them is because they are measuring God by their own small rule, from their own standpoint. We love men as long as we consider them worthy of our love; when they are not we cast them off. It is not so with God. There is a vast difference between human love and Divine love.

The Way to God is a collection of sermons illustrating the simplicity of salvation. Moody doesn’t use heavy philosophy, but simply shows how God does not mean for salvation to be a deep, complicated subject man could not understand. Published in 1884, this book had sold 435,000 copies by 1900.

Dwight L. Moody was born at Northfield, Mass. on Feb. 5, 1837. Moody was an American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School, the Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts, the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Publishers.

He may well have been the greatest evangelist of all time. In a 40-year period he won one million souls, founded three Christian schools, launched a great Christian publishing business, established a world-renowned Christian conference center, and inspired literally thousands of preachers to win souls and conduct revivals.

After you have read the book, we would love to hear what you thought in the Customer Reviews box on the bottom of the book’s page.

Have you read anything that has inspired you lately? Share with us in the comments below!

Get to Know Donald Cantrell

donald cantrellDonald Cantrell has been a preacher of the gospel since 1980. His goal in writing books is to be helpful to ministers who may need a simple thought to prompt them in developing a mighty message. His hope is to be practical, preachable, and accessible to the busy and pressured pastor.

In addition to preaching and writing, Donald has been active in personal sermon consulting and research, offering help with individual sermon development, subject research, Bible character studies, and sermon series. He has also helped various pastorates with the leading of revivals.

With the new release of his Bible Commentary Snapshots on WORDsearch today, we talked with the Florida Gators fan about his alliteration style, preaching, and his writing process.

WORDsearch: Where did you get the idea for this series?

Donald Cantrell: I have people contact me all the time from around the world, asking for advice. I like mentoring and helping people, that’s the primary goal. In the SBC in Georgia, the high majority of people are bivocational, and me doing this can help save them time.

I’ve always developed sermons and done alliteration, but then I started thinking what I wanted to do was come up with something catchy that would give a pastor or preacher something they could take straight to the puplit or develop into a full sermon on their own. I really liked the term “sermon snapshots.” I thought about it for a few days and really think it describes the material I create for a preacher.

 WS: What would you say is different in this work from your other works?

DC: This one I will try to do every verse in the New Testament and make sure every verse has an outline, or part of an outline, and that it’s alliterated. So far I’ve got Matthew- Acts, and I  just got done with 50 Christmas snapshots.

WS: What is your process in creating content? How do you get started?

DC: My main process is to first read the Scripture and then I like to think about it. Then I do my three or four main points, alliterate them, but very simply. Then I try to develop my main thoughts. Here’s how I look at it: I look at it like at first minimum alliteration, then once I have my main thoughts I go back and change and adapt it, then when it’s all said and done, my whole outline is all done, and I have what I call maximum alliteration. Alliteration is my thing, I’ve always been able to do it once I’ve started.

WS: How do you choose the verses or topics you cover?

DC: Well, I’m a pastor and I design sermons for my church also. If I get into something I really like at my church, I might just make a whole series out of it and offer it to pastors.

WS: How do you come up with your sermons?

DC: I like to do expository preaching, going through a book verse-by-verse, so that helps me a lot. That way I’m not just trying to come up with sermons, because if I know I’m preaching through a certain book, I know I’m going to have to have a sermon on that book on Sunday. Exposition with alliteration is my style.

WS: How often or long do you write each day?

DC: I write every day, and I have a process that I use. I read Scripture and if I want to develop a sermon, I use my computer now. I used to use a big ink pen with four colors, and I’ve got boxes of sermons with colored sermon outlines with a different color for each point. Then I adapted to the computer and now I’ve got all of that on the computer and have embraced it. I use Strong’s, my Bible, and a tool for alliteration.

WS: What’s your favorite Bible commentary?

In my ministry, I’ve had a lot of preachers ask this, and what I tell all of them is J. Vernon McGee’s Commentaries. What I like about him is that he covers every chapter, and they are simple and practical. I’m just simple and I just like simple stuff. But if I had to get rid of all my books in my library and keep one set it would be his.

WS: What is your favorite Bible translation?

I’m old school, I love the KJV just because I like the terminology and poetry, but I read a lot of different versions. I like the ESV, I don’t preach from it, but I study from it a lot. The reason I stick with the KJV is because it’s what I read when I was younger and what I memorized, so I’m familiar with it and just stuck with it over the years. 

Donald resides in Georgia with Denise, his wife of 33 years, and spends a lot of time with his grandbaby Kinsley.

Don’t miss our introductory sale on Cantrell’s new Bible Commentary Snapshots, along with 50 percent off all of his other works.

-Katie Cornett

Saturday’s Roundup

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Please tell me when you’ll have the Word Biblical Commentary!” Well folks, it’s here! This whole week here at WORDsearch was focused on getting the WBC released and out to you, and we are so grateful for your patience! In case you missed it, here are some more details, along with what else you might have missed this week.

The Word Biblical Commentary – Unmatched Level of Precise Scholarship

The WBC is one of our most requested resources, and for good reason. It is highly regarded by pastors, preachers, teachers, and the academic community. Each commentator was chosen for his specific area of expertise, and you’ll experience this by the unmatched level of precise scholarship. Most commentaries tend to have a dominant focus that will be expositional, critical, summary, application, homiletical, or devotional. With the WBC, you get all of that in one commentary. The best part? For a limited time this set is available for $299.95, (aka only $5.17 a volume) so don’t miss this opportunity!

Enhance Your Understanding of the Bible – New Study Bibles

Another common request has been fulfilled this week – the excellent HCSB Study Bible content has been formatted for two more translations, the KJV and NKJV. All the maps, photos, illustrations, charts, articles, and word studies that make the HCSB Study Bible so popular are included.  In WORDsearch, Study Bible Notes can be used with any translation, but with this content, the difference is any time a verse is quoted in the study material, it will be quoted in the translation of your preference.

Oh, and don’t forget there are only a few days left to get the Adrian Rogers videos. After October 2, they will no longer be offered for sale.

Blog Posts You Might Have Missed This Week from WORDsearch

“There is, and has been a narcissistic obsession and love affair with self that cannot be denied” – Guest Post: Did You Know that Selfie Is in the Bible?

Create a Deeper Sermon or Lesson with The Pastor/Teacher’s Toolkit – Cross-Reference Explorer

“Never Stop Praying” & See You At the Pole 2014

Have a great weekend, and remember, don’t miss any news or updates by liking us on Facebook or following us on Twitter. And don’t forget we are also on Pinterest if you ever need inspiration or recipes.

Quick Tips – Narrow Your Search with Topic Explorer

The Topic Explorer in WORDsearch is a powerful tool that searches your entire library for a single subject in seconds. Instead of searching every word of every book for your search term, the Topic Explorer narrows your search by looking only at the the titles of articles and chapters that include or are related to your search term. Imagine searching the subject indexes of all of your books in an instant, and you’ll have imagined the Topic Explorer.

Let’s say we want to teach a lesson or create a sermon on the broad topic of “love.” First, we’ll click on the Topic Explorer icon to open the window.

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There are two different types of searches we can do with the Topic Explorer. The first and fastest type, “At beginning of topic,” looks only at the first word in our subject indices for our search term. The second and more thorough type, “Anywhere in topic,” searches every word in our subject indices for our search term.

Let’s look at how to get the shorter list first. To do this, we’ll follow these steps:

  1. Type “love” in the Search for: bar at the top of the Topic Explorer window
  2. Choose “At the beginning of topic” from the Find topic text drop down option
  3. Select a collection of books to search or choose to search all books
  4. Click the search button

As expected, all of our results start with the word “love,” because we chose to find only the index entries that begin with the word “love.”

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For the second type of search we can do, we follow the same instructions as above, but choose “Anywhere in topic” in step two, we’ll see a longer list of results. For example, our search results now include “Beloved Disciple,” “Brotherly Love,” “Family of Love,” and more. This is because we chose to find index entries that include the word “love” anywhere within them.

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When we click on the plus sign next to one of our search results, for example, the “Beloved Disciple”, we’re shown the book that includes the topic (sometimes there is more than one). From there, we can click on the entry in the book to read what the book says. If we want to continue reading a particular entry in a new window,we can click on the button “Open in new window”.

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The Topic Explorer defaults to sorting our results by Topic alphabetically, but we can also sort our results alphabetically by book title or book category (i.e., location). Another helpful feature within the Topic Explorer is the red level button. When we click this button and then expand a topic, book, or category, every sub-folder underneath that topic, book, or category will also be expanded, so we don’t have to keep clicking through the levels to get to our results.

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The Topic Explorer is one of our favorite features of WORDsearch, because it makes finding relevant material so easy and so efficient.

Have you made an exciting or surprising discovery because of the Topic Explorer tool lately? We’d love to hear about it in our comments below!